All posts filed under: guest post

Neighborhood Retrofitting: Making Place Matter [guest post]

Here is another gem from my dear friend Alex, about her experience in St. Louis.  Enjoy! In my first post I extolled the City Museum, a hyper expression of St. Louis’s past and its potential. The city itself is likewise defined, at least in part, by what it was and what it could be.  Old North St. Louis, an historical neighborhood north of downtown, is steadily overcoming the severe disinvestment it experienced in the past. There, the devoted and competent Old North St. Louis Restoration Group has been orchestrating the transition. I had the opportunity to intern at the Restoration Group this past summer, and I wanted to introduce this impressive CDC and share a few of my thoughts. To set the scene, here are some before and after photos for your ogling pleasure. These photos show Crown Square, the Restoration Group’s stunning, recently completed $35 million rehabilitation of 27 buildings on what was formerly the 14th Street Pedestrian Mall. All of the photos in this post are courtesy of the Restoration Group. You can …

every city should have a city museum (guest post)

< this post is by my good friend Alex Reisman, whom I asked to share her thoughts about st. louis with us.  enjoy her incredible photos and this first of several entries! > Diana has invited me to write a little bit about St. Louis. I went to college there and recently returned for a six-week internship at the venerable community development corporation and mouthful Old North St. Louis Restoration Group. I feel uncharacteristically religious about St. Louis. Evangelical about its patent potential. If you walk around downtown and many neighborhoods, you might declare, as a visitor of mine did, that “it feels so empty.” But spend some time in the subtext of St. Louis and you would find that the city is in fact—to borrow a friend’s favorite word in college—rife. There are exquisite details everywhere, crumbling buildings to be restored, old mistakes to be avoided, and dire legacies of racism and economic hardship from which to recover. To a large degree, St. Louis’ redemption is and will be in the salvage of its …